China : Guidelines on “civilised travel abroad”

 

Most of Chinese tourists were happy to discover these new rules “how to behave when travelling abroad”.

Most of Chinese travellers are well educated and think that some Chinese People need to be educated because China’s image is based on the attitude of their people abroad.

Timed to coincide with the National Day holiday, the new rules follow growing frustration among Hongkongers over the unruly conduct of some mainland tourists.

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A guide book

The national tourism administration issued a 64-page rulebook illustrated with cartoons, containing regulations forbidding mainland tourists to behave in “uncivilised” ways for overseas travel

 

tourism chinese Tourist chinese tourists chinese

 

The rules urged travellers to behave and “abide by the norms of civilised tourist behaviour”

 

Example of Tips

 

General guidelines explain not spitting on the streets, not shouting in public areas, not forcing locals to help take pictures, not throwing rubbish and not picking their noses.

 

1: Refrain from limp handshakes.

2: Soiling a swimming pool is frowned upon.

3: Do not pick your nose in public.

4: Keep nasal hair trimmed at all times.

5: Do not leave footprints on the toilet seat.

6: If you have to pick your teeth, do not use your fingers.

7: Try not to drink soup straight from the bowl or make slurping sounds.

8: Do not take airplane life jackets as gifts.

9: Do not coerce locals into taking your photo.

10: Do not talk about people behind their back in Chinese (because someone nearby might understand you).

 

You can also find Tips by Country:

 

France: If invited to a home, do not bring yellow flowers.

Germany: Do not click your fingers (“finger clicking is for dogs”).

Spain: Women are considered naked without earrings.

Scotland: Do not buy stones as souvenirs

Britain: Do not ask Brits whether or not they’ve eaten.

Hungary: Do not smash mirrors.

Hong Kong: Do not try to get a refund for your food or smoke in air-conditioned rooms.

Thailand: Do not talk about the royal family.

Japan: Do not fiddle with your hair or clothes during meals.

Nepal: Don’t touch people’s belongings with your foot.

Algeria: Don’t touch other people’s heads.

Iran: Do not comment on babies’ eyes.

India: Don’t touch other people with your left hand.

Islamic countries: Refrain from talking about pork.

African countries: Do not call Africans “Negros.”

 

Other behaviour mainland tourists should avoid included occupying public toilets for too long and taking excessive amounts of food at buffets, the guidebook said.

 

 

Domestic travel habits emulated in the world, and will become an embarrassment for the Chinese population with the unprecedented travel boom (+20% growth). 2 result for explaining this increase of outbound tourists :  the result of an increasingly wealthy population and an easing in global visa restrictions.

After the Luxor Temple event’*…Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang told citizens !

“Improving the civilized quality of the citizens and building a good image of Chinese tourists are the obligations of governments on all levels and relevant agencies and companies,”

 

(*)the vandal carved ‘Ding Jinhao was here’ in Chinese in the 3,500 year old Luxor Temple.Parents of a 15-year-old Chinese tourist have apologized after the teenager defaced a stone sculpture in an ancient Egyptian temple with graffiti.

 

egypt luxor

The act drew ire in both Egypt and China — generating a massive online backlash amongst China’s unforgiving netizens.

 

115millions of Chinese tourists are expected to travel abroad in 2013.

 

Tomo has realized a funny video to explain the Guidelines

 

Sources:

 

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